Into the wood (Copy)

Work

“Into the Wood” proposes a journey of discovery, of surprise at what physically makes us uncomfortable: apparent instability, a constant game of wills, nature in its purest state, and the artist’s action on it. A landscape of transformed nature, at the limit of its physical properties and in contradiction with itself, a very particular forest.

This sculptural installation is made up of 3 pieces. One of them will be made onsite, using a 2-metre-tall tree trunk weighing approximately 250 kilos and which has been partially burnt, making reference to the fire suffered by the old Sanctuary of Meritxell. The artist’s father was one of the engineers that rebuilt the Sanctuary.

Location

The Cloister of the Sanctuary of Meritxell, in the Parish of Canillo, is an outdoor space surrounded by modern architecture, formed by arches. This sanctuary is symbolically very important to the country, as it accommodates the patron saint, the Virgin Meritxell.

Biography

Xavier Puente Vilardell (Barcelona, 1970), earned his Degree in Architecture from the ETSAB (Barcelona School of Architecture) in 1997. Thanks to his family history (his maternal grandfather was a painter and wood carver), he has been working with wood, and particularly with pine, since he was very young.

However, he decided to study architecture, driven by his obsession for construction and the mastery of volumes. Through the years, that more technical facet would gradually evolve into a need for a freer means of expression that only sculpture would allow him to develop. Hence, it was in his work as a sculptor that he would find his greatest freedom, and it was specifically in wood where he would most fully exercise his artistic desire.

In 2007, he held his first exhibition, receiving the Viladecans City Award for Sculpture in the 4th celebration of the awards. Puente is a tireless sculptor and his work is the result of a pure, deep and sincere emotion. His sculptures are expressed and interact through the strong Mediterranean tradition, and the orifices that the artist sculpts in the wood become beams of light that caress his organic shapes.