Martin Hill PhiliPpa jones

Martin Hill
Philippa Jones (NZ)

Biography

Martin Hill was born in 1946 in London (UK). After studying art and design at the High Wycombe University School, in his native city, he went on to work as a designer in London, Nairobi, Sydney and Auckland (New Zealand), where he founded his own design company and won countless national and international awards.

In 1992, he began to make environmental sculpture works. The photographs of these ephemeral sculptures, which were taken in collaboration with his life partner, Philippa Jones, have been published and exhibited internationally. A book of photos of the sculptures, titled “Earth to Earth”, was published in 2007 and brought him to correspond with world leaders in sustainability. In 2010, a film about his art work was produced, titled “A Delicate Canvas”.

His recent projects include “Watershed”, an exhibition that explores the water cycle and climate change, which was displayed in Melbourne (Australia) and New Zealand in 2014 and which served as the base for an exhibition at the Pingyao International Photography Festival (China) in 2015, winning an Award for Photographic Excellence. He has most recently taken part in the “Artists in Antarctica” programme and has done an artist’s residency in Fiordland (New Zealand).

He is also currently working on his “Fine Line” project, a work in progress that he began in 1995: twelve ephemeral sculptures that were made at high altitude and connected by a line that encircles the Earth. Martin Hill and Philippa Jones live and work in Wanaka, in the Southern Alps of New Zealand.

BEYOND: THE WATERSHED

Exhibition

The international award-winning photographs of the ephemeral environmental sculptures of Martin Hill, which were taken in collaboration with Philippa Jones, draw on nature’s power to transform the principles of design to awaken humankind’s consciousness, to promote the transition to a restorative cyclical economy.

Using natural materials that can only be found in pristine untouched natural places, Hill and Jones, who live in New Zealand, travel the world making ephemeral sculptures that only last a short period of time, until they are once again absorbed into the natural system from which they are made.

The photographs aim to evoke the powerful connection between the viewer and the principles of the natural world, which the artists believe have been lost in modern culture. For them, that disconnection is the main cause of our disconnection from nature and from one another, giving rise to our lack of sustainability.

Location

At Rambla Molines (Andorra la Vella) next to the Congress Centre that will host the 16th Meeting of the European Council workshop for the implementation of the European Landscape Convention – “Landscape and transfrontier cooperation”.

OPENING PRESENTATION

The first Andorra Land Art International Biennial will be opening with a magnificent, first-rate presentation. Two of the world’s leading artists in this field, British artists Martin Hill and Philippa Jones, who live in New Zealand, will be there in person with a screen projection to describe their art work in the recent years, which has been honoured and awarded internationally. Hill and Jones will also speak of the philosophy of sustainability that resides at the heart of their work and which explores issues such as how to stop the extinction process of life on Earth, while offering possible solutions taken from nature.

From the works carried out on the beaches of New Zealand to the pieces created at the tops of its mountains, from the equatorial rainforests of Madagascar to the ice of Antarctica, the artistic work of Martin Hill and Philippa Jones delves into a planetary perspective on the relationship between humankind and the fragile ecosystems of our world.

The opening conference, which will be held on Thursday 10 September 2015 at 19:30 in the Comú d’Escaldes-Engordany meeting room, will bring together most of the Biennial’s participating artists, who will be installing their works in the different selected locations in the preceding days.